photography, travel

#findyourpark | A QUICK INTRO TO GLACIER

One of America’s most spectacular parks is without a doubt, Glacier. Now, you may have heard me say that I have been making plans to visit this park every year for nearly 10 years, and every year the plans fall through. Well… it finally happened. And it was worth the wait.

ARS_GNP_20160719_6079

This post will not be my typical #FindYourPark post, full of info, locations, tips, etc. Since it was my first visit, I had to stumble around a bit, explore, and figure things out for myself. When I have the chance to return, I will be on a mission: to gather all of the most relevant information for all of you to have an epic experience in Glacier National Park!

So for now, please enjoy my thoughts, reflections, and images from my long awaited first visit to Glacier….

ARS_GNP_20160719_6085

I always do a decent bit of research before I head out to any new park, so Glacier was no exception. So there were a few “must sees” and “must dos” that I knew about, and of course at the top of the list was Going-To-The-Sun-Road.

ARS_GNP_20160719_6094

It was the first thing we did when we got to the park. Spectacular.

ARS_GNP_20160719_6106

ARS_GNP_20160719_6116

The next morning, I decided to try my luck at Lake McDonald, another very famous area for landscape shooters.

ARS_GNP_160720_6075

ARS_GNP_160722_6170

ARS_GNP_160722_6185

After a beautiful sunrise, we decided to check out one of the park’s most popular short hikes, Hidden Lake. It is the shortest hike to get up into the high country and experience the vibrant blue mountain lakes. It’s also a great place to see the park’s most quirky residents up close and personal… mountain goats.

ARS_GNP_20160721_6161

ARS_GNP_20160721_6165

ARS_GNP_20160721_6168

Unfortunately it was the wrong time of day to get the shot I wanted, but I’m sure it won’t be the last time I hike to Hidden Lake.

On a particularly cloudy day, I decided to take advantage of the soft, even light, and do some creek and waterfall shots. McDonald Creek was the perfect candidate.

ARS_GNP_160722_6354

Rolling steadily through hemlock forests, eventually cascading over water-worn rocks, McDonald was never visually disappointing.

ARS_GNP_160722_6205

ARS_GNP_160722_6212

ARS_GNP_160722_6216

ARS_GNP_160722_6225

And of course it was back to Lake McDonald to see how afternoon/ evening light would paint this landscape.

ARS_GNP_20160722_6451

I took a few mornings to explore the far West and Northwest of the park. Definitely needed more time up at Bowman and Kintla.

ARS_GNP_20160723_6780

ARS_GNP_20160723_6846

ARS_GNP_20160725_6913

ARS_GNP_20160725_6925

Up and over Going-to-the-sun-road a few more times…

ARS_GNP_160725_6416

Then, but not soon enough, it was on to the East side of the park.

ARS_GNP_20160724_6881

St. Mary’s Lake, Two Medicine, and of course, Many Glacier.

ARS_GNP_20160724_6905

ARS_GNP_160726_6951

ARS_GNP_160726_7028

ARS_GNP_160726_6443

Many Glacier provided the much desired cloud/ peak drama I was really wanting to capture. All of Glacier has this potential, but on my short visit, Many Glacier was the sweet spot.

ARS_GNP_160726_6486

ARS_GNP_160727_7158

So after an inaugural trip like this, I certainly have favorite spots, locations that I know I want to revisit… now with the much needed knowledge that comes from experience. But there were also so many places that I just did’t have time to see/ check out.

It is a vast wilderness. With so many hidden visual treasures lurking around every bend in the road, trail, river.

It’s now a forgone conclusion that I will be back… I hope sooner rather than later.

— Andrew


Ellen and I have hit the road full-time! Help us on our mission to inspire and educate everyone on the importance of getting outside by checking out my workshops and my prints, made #ontheroad in my mobile print studio. The revenue will help propel us further and further on this great adventure. Enrich yourself and others… and feel great about it too as you’re helping to ensure our wild lands are cherished and to keep the wild spirit of the American Dream alive. Our goal is to visit all 59 National Parks in 2-4 years. LEARN MORE ABOUT WHAT WE’RE DOING HERE



Want to learn photography and enjoy a guided experience? Check out my exciting, NEW workshop dates:
 
TELLURIDE // LANDSCAPE + MOUNTAIN LIGHT // 2016 – SOLD OUT
TELLURIDE // LANDSCAPE + MOUNTAIN LIGHT (Trip 2) // 2016 – ONLY 2 SPOTS AVAILABLE
LOCAL + PRIVATE WORKSHOP // 2016 – AFFORDABLE RATES FOR ME TO COME TO YOU
BIG BEND // LANDSCAPE + NIGHT SKY // 2017 – MOST POPULAR! 6 SPOTS AVAILABLE
LEARN PHOTO + CAMERA BASICS // DALLAS // 2016 – 20 SPOTS!
 
I’m excited to announce my “The Photographic Guide to Our National Parks” series of eBooks:
 
See what’s NEW
 
If you are interested in purchasing a “print from the road”, please check my prints for sale, or email me directly for a custom request:
 
Andrew R. Slaton | photographer // prints
 
If you are interested in licensing any of the images/ video from this post, please visit my stock agency:
 
Tandem Stills + Motion // Andrew R. Slaton
Image Brief // Andrew R. Slaton
  
For assignment work requests, please email me: andrew@andrewslatonphoto.com
 
Thanks for visiting AndrewSlatonBlog.com!
 
all images and content © ARS Media, LLC 2016
Standard
education, photography, travel

#findyourpark | ROCKY MOUNTAIN

Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado is the quintessential Summer mountain destination. With cool temps in the 40’s to upper 70’s, it’s a nice getaway from the sweltering heat of the lowlands. It is incredibly beautiful in any season, but Summer offers the most to see and do since the elevations can reach in to the 14k’s. And what better time to visit this iconic park, than the Summer of 2016, the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.

I admit that I visited this park a little later in life. My family used to go camping in Colorado every Summer, but for some reason, we stayed mostly in the south/ southwest part of the state, in the San Juan mountains. I did not first visit Rocky Mountain National Park until 2013. But I’ve made up for lost time and visited many times in the last several years. It is a truly spectacular park with much to see and do.

There is so much to see and do, in fact, that this post is in no way comprehensive. It is simply a list of some of my favorites, and many of the “musts”.

ARS_RMNP_141023_1606

When To Go

As I’ve stated, Summer is definitely the most popular time of year, and for good reason; good weather (just watch out for afternoon thunderstorms!), abundant wildlife, easy access, etc. But Fall is spectacular with colorful foliage, no mosquitos, and energetic wildlife, frantically preparing for the harsh Winter to come. It’s moodier in the Fall. The weather is unpredictable and makes for more interesting photos.

Winter is quite nice in its own way as well, but very cold, and many of the roads are closed. The road to Bear Lake is open though. Winter transforms any mountain destination into a peaceful, quiet scene, and RMNP is no exception. Plus the crowds are virtually non-existent.

How To Get There

RMNP is one of the most easily accessed National Parks, as it is a short drive from Denver International Airport. Flights into DEN are relatively cheap, and so are rental cars. So whether you drive or fly, it doesn’t have to break the bank to get there.

From Denver, head north along I-25 until reaching Loveland. Take 34 to Estes Park, which is right outside the park. There are other routes to take from Denver, but I have found this to be the quickest, least trafficked.

Driving Trail Ridge Road at night, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Be prepared for many cars, trucks, and RV’s on the road into Estes Park, and RMNP, especially in Summer. If you’ve been to Yellowstone or Yosemite, reference these memories. Just take your time and relax. Enjoy the scenery, even if traffic jams aren’t your thing :) Chances are, if you keep your eyes peeled, even with all the people and automobiles, you’ll get to see wildlife wherever you are.

Where To Stay

If camping isn’t your thing, there are so many options in and around the wonderful little town of Estes Park. From cheap motels, to swanky hotels with all the amenities, there is no shortage of places to stay within 15 minutes of RMNP. However, even with an abundance of options, the wise traveler will book as early as possible to ensure their desired accommodations. This area receives over 3.5 million visitors every year, so plan ahead.

If you’re a camper, like me, you can of course stay at any one of the developed campgrounds within the park, though they fill very quickly, especially in the Summer. There are even several NPS maintained campgrounds just outside RMNP, that serve as popular alternative access points to the park. For NPS camping info, go here.

To download a full, detailed park map of Rocky Mountain National Park, click here or the image below:

Screen Shot 2016-06-20 at 12.16.56 PM

ARS_RMNP_0613_0249

As you can see in the map, the park is surrounded by National Forest. These can provide great, free (or low cost) camping as well, but keep in mind, it will be primitive. I’ve car camped several times in undeveloped Arapaho (west) and Roosevelt (east) National Forest sites, and really enjoyed the solitude and cheap living. Usually, the park can be accessed within a 20 minute drive from many of these sites. They are first come, first served though, and some roads may be too rough for low clearance vehicles and large trailers/ RVs.

What To Do

I feel silly writing about this, because it would seem obvious to some. But Rocky Mountain National Park really is one of those parks with so much to see and do, it may help to have a few things highlighted for the first-timers.

Driving

There is so much to see just from the car window, so a good bit of time can be spent driving. From Many Parks Curve and all of Trail Ridge Road to Old Fall River Road and Moraine Park, many beautiful scenes can be seen right from the passenger seat.

alluvial fan, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Driving Trail Ridge Road, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Trail Ridge Road (TRR) is one of the great, paved alpine roads through the Rockies. Drivers can wind up from Deer Ridge Junction to top out at over 12,000 feet elevation. Keep in mind that Trail Ridge Road closes in mid-October, due to the high elevations. There are many stops along the way to get out and experience, including (but not limited to): Many Parks Curve, Lava Cliffs, Alpine Ridge Trail, Medicine Bow Curve, etc. The Alpine Visitor Center is your best spot for info, restrooms, gifts, and refreshments. It sits atop near the highest point in the road (12183 ft) and boasts phenomenal views. TRR is a must drive for anyone visiting RMNP. Just be sure to hydrate, as it is common to experience symptoms of altitude sickness at these elevations.

Driving Trail Ridge Road, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Old Fall River Road is a one-way alternate route to the top of TRR. Starting about a mile past the Alluvial Fan, cars can switchback their way through forests past gorgeous flowing streams, up steep switchbacks to get a whole different view of the subalpine and alpine ecosystems. Eventually arriving up at the Alpine Visitor Center, at the top of Trail Ridge Road. Keep in mind that this road is only open from July 4 through September. Be sure to take it slow, and bring plenty of water!

silhouetted cyclists on trail ridge road, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Wildlife Viewing 

This is one of the best parks in the U.S., except possibly Yellowstone, to view wildlife. Rocky Mountain elk, moose, deer, black bear, coyote, eagles, hawks, fox, pika, big horn sheep, and more can all be seen in one day here.

Cow moose with baby Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

bull elk in velvet in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Slowly driving the main roads is one great way to see wildlife. Begin early and stay late are the mottos of successful wildlife watchers. Dawn and dusk are the best times to see animals, just about anywhere. It can be a gamble to see anything during the heat of the day. Animals are typically resting in shaded areas hidden by the dense forests and rocky outcroppings, making spotting them nearly impossible.

Bull Elk resting in high alpine tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Bighorn sheep crossing the road in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

For very specific tips on where to find certain wildlife, and how to photograph them, see my new eBook, The Photographic Guide to Rocky Mountain National Park.

Bighorn sheep crossing the road in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Cow moose in the Colorado River, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

american robin, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Two Mule deer bucks spar on the side of the road during the rut in rocky mountain national park.

Rocky Mountain Bull Elk, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Hiking

In 2013 massive flooding occurred in the town of Estes Park and parts of the eastern side of RMNP. Please check with a ranger station for up to date trail conditions before embarking on any hikes.

hikers, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

RMNP has  hundreds of miles of scenic trails throughout the park, ranging from very easy, to very difficult. Depending upon your skill level there really is something for everyone. Be sure always to hydrate more than you think you need to, and try to avoid late afternoon hiking in the Summer, as lightning is a very real danger.

A front rolls in over Long's Peak in spectacular color.

Long's peak from Bear Lake, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

The Bear Lake trailhead offers several stunning, but heavily trafficked hikes. Due to its high volume of visitors, there are shuttles available to avoid the potential parking nightmare.

rocky-mountain-bear-lake-trail-map

The best (and most popular) from the Bear Lake trailhead is, of course, Dream Lake. Download the map above! This is a fairly easy hike and very heavily used, but for good reason. Starting at the Bear Lake trailhead, it is only a few miles to stunning alpine views of Hallett and other peaks. The trail passes Nymph Lake, then up to incredible Dream Lake, and if you keep going, the next reward is Emerald Lake. All three are beautiful and worth seeing and photographing in their own rights. You may not beat the crowds with this hike, but it is certainly a “must see & do”.

hikers at dream lake, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Sunrise at Dream Lake, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

waterfall near emerad laek, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

There are over 300 miles of trails to hike in RMNP. And all of them have merit. Consult the book recommended above for more great hikes, specific to what you’re looking to see/ achieve.

Backpacking

There are so many great backpacking opportunities within the boundaries of Rocky Mountain National Park, well, and many more in the immediately surrounding areas for that matter. If you plan to backpack in RMNP, you will need a few things specific to the park: First, stop at the Wilderness Office for a permit and current wilderness information. For more info, go HERE. You will also need a bear proof food container. I recommend this one. Next, you will need a good map. The one provided above is great for basics, but if you choose to venture out in to the backcountry, you will definitely want this map.

Timber Creek, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

sunrise at Odessa Lake, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Creek flowing out of Odessa Lake, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Fern Lake, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

This is clearly a Rocky Mountain NP specific, (very) short list. If this is your first time backpacking, I recommend reading up on what gear and clothing you will need generally, and how to prepare for several nights in the backcountry. Any time you step in to the wilderness, life becomes very serious, and all about survival. That statement is not meant to scare anyone away from enjoying such an experience, it is simply to highlight the fact that trekking into the wild, with none of the comforts/ securities of modern life can take many people by surprise. Search and rescue missions have increased exponentially in recent years, often due to the unpreparedness of people. Be aware! And enjoy responsibly.

night at Odessa Lake, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

If you are looking for a beautiful, quick overnighter, Timber Lake, and Odessa Lake are my favorites. Both are under 8 miles one way and offer beautiful views, and a wonderful backcountry experience. The Timber Lake trailhead is on the east side of the park, just 10 miles north of Grand Lake. Odessa Lake can be accessed either from the Bear Lake or Fern Lake trailheads.

Fishing

Sport fishing is allowed in the park, and all that is required is a valid Colorado fishing license. There are many idyllic streams, lakes, and rivers within the park to break out the fly rod or spinner reel, where one can experience peace and solitude. But be aware of any regulations and or conservation efforts in place before packing up and heading out. All current regulations and information can be found HERE.

creek in forest, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Fly fishing Dream Lake, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Dream Lake outlet waterfall in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

creek near dream lake, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

timber creek, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Photography

This park is one of my favorite for all of its photographic opportunities. Regarding landscape, wildlife, stars, and general nature photography, it is one of the best.

Stars over dream lake, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

columbine, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

A front rolls in at dawn over Long's Peak in spectacular color.

There are of course the tourist spots, where you’ll be elbowing other people to get some of the classic postcard shots, but then there are the off the beaten path spots. I am now putting major time and effort into providing you with all of my favorite secrets within our National Parks, and I’m excited to announce Rocky Mountain NP as my first eBook! You can look forward to maps, locations, photo tips, and much more in this soon-to-be-released eBook. Pre-order it HERE to get a discount.

smooth rose, Rosa blanda, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

Stars over Long's Peak and Bear lake in Rocky Mountain National Park.

I hope you have found this information useful. Even more than that though, I hope this encourages you to get out and experience one of our national natural treasures, Rocky Mountain National Park! As always, for the most up to date, comprehensive park information, please visit the official NPS website for RMNP.

— Andrew


Ellen and I have hit the road full-time! Help us on our mission to inspire and educate everyone on the importance of getting outside by checking out my workshops and my prints, made #ontheroad in my mobile print studio. The revenue will help propel us further and further on this great adventure. Enrich yourself and others… and feel great about it too as you’re helping to ensure our wild lands are cherished and to keep the wild spirit of the American Dream alive. Our goal is to visit all 59 National Parks in 2-4 years. LEARN MORE ABOUT WHAT WE’RE DOING HERE



Want to learn photography and enjoy a guided experience? Check out my exciting, NEW workshop dates:
 
TELLURIDE // LANDSCAPE + MOUNTAIN LIGHT // 2016 – SOLD OUT
TELLURIDE // LANDSCAPE + MOUNTAIN LIGHT (Trip 2) // 2016 – ONLY 3 SPOTS AVAILABLE
LOCAL + PRIVATE WORKSHOP// 2016 – AFFORDABLE RATES FOR ME TO COME TO YOU
BIG BEND // LANDSCAPE + NIGHT SKY // 2017 – MOST POPULAR! 7 SPOTS AVAILABLE
 
I’m excited to announce my “A Photographic Guide To Our National Parks” Ebooks:
 
See what’s NEW
 
If you are interested in purchasing a “print from the road”, please check my prints for sale, or email me directly for a custom request:
 
Andrew R. Slaton | photographer // prints
 
If you are interested in licensing any of the images/ video from this post, please visit my stock agency:
 
Tandem Stills + Motion // Andrew R. Slaton
Image Brief // Andrew R. Slaton
  
For assignment work requests, please email me: andrew@andrewslatonphoto.com
 
Thanks for visiting AndrewSlatonBlog.com!
 
all images and content © ARS Media, LLC 2016
Standard
photography, travel

#findyourpark | GRAND TETON

Where to begin?? Grand Teton National Park is one of the most magnificent 310,000 acres in all of North America. If there were ever a “bucket list” National Park… this is it.

I first laid eyes on the Teton Range, for which the park is named, nearly 15 years ago. It was sincerely love at first sight. But even more than that, there is a feeling of wildness I have never experienced anywhere else. I’ve spent years exploring the Colorado and New Mexico section of the Rockies, but there’s something quite different when you enter a land where the ultimate spirits of the West still resides; the grizzly bear and wolf.

ARS_WY_20160122_1178

ARS_WY_20160122_1187

I have literally thousands of images from this awe-inspiring park, but I’m going to show only new images from my most recent trip in February. You can view every season in the park in this blog’s archive search bar to the right… just type “Tetons”.

When To Go

So which season is the best to visit, you might be thinking? Well, each is unique and beautiful and they have their own benefits: winter is haunting and quiet. Now, yes, it’s freaking cold too. Like, you could die if you’re not prepared kind of cold. It can reach temps of -50 degrees F in this part of Wyoming, so be prepared with layer after layer. But you will never see such amazing sunsets and sunrises as you will in the winter. And the crowds are few and far between. It’s my second favorite time of year.

My first is fall…. swoon. Fall is absolutely magnificent. The summer crowds begin to dissipate, the animals get energized for mating season, the leaves catch fire with color, the air gets a biting chill and the first snowfall hits. It’s just amazing. And… the mosquitos are mostly gone. Which brings me to summer :)

Summer is beautiful. Warmer temps, animals abounding… but so are the mosquitos and crowds. Don’t get me wrong, summer is fantastic. I just tend toward avoiding crowds in my special places of mountain goodness.

Now spring is a bit tricky. Locals call it “the muddy season,” and for very good reason. After the massive amounts of snow melt, the ground is super muddy for at least 1-2 months. Usually May and June are like this. And if you’re wanting to get up the high country, there’s way too much snow still until July. But even this time of year is pretty… deep greens and blues abound and wildflowers begin to bloom. And the masses have not yet begun to descend on the area for the summer season.

Each season has it’s benefits and pitfalls, so carefully look at the pros and cons and choose the right time for your trip that fits your expectations.

ARS_WY_20160122_1202

Where To Stay

Grand Teton National Park is right outside of the town of Jackson, Wyoming. So if camping isn’t your thing, there are plenty of hotels, motels, hostels, and even dude ranches in the area at which to stay. If you’re a camper like me, you’ll be overjoyed to find that most of the park borders National Forest, so cheap and/ or free camping is everywhere. There are just a few developed campsites in the park, and to be honest, I’ve never stayed at any of them… because… honestly… if you’re camping, why would you want to be right next to other people AND have to pay too much ($22/ night) for it? I dunno… call me crazy. But if you like that sort of thing, here’s the info you need.

ARS_WY_20160122_1251

How To Get There

Luckily, even though small, Jackson, Wyoming has a decent sized airport (JAC) with many flights coming in and out daily. It can be pricey though, depending on what time of year you’re flying and where you’re flying from. Salt Lake City, Utah (SLC) is probably the closest, cheapest international airport and is about a 4.5-5 hour drive. But you may save a ton of $ flying and driving from SLC, so check it out if your a budget traveler like me. Keep in mind though when renting a car, if you’re planning to travel here in anything but summer, you may want an SUV or even better, 4 wheel drive. The mud in the spring and snow in the winter and fall can be treacherous. It is not uncommon, even among locals, to get stuck in the ditch. Just be prepared. It’s even nice to have in the summer too.

SLC has a ton of Subarus for rent, which I would recommend for the price and abilities. AWD but decent gas mileage. Not too shabby.

If you’re driving the whole way, be prepared for immense beauty and abundant wildlife as you get within 250 miles on any side of the park. You may want to spend some time working your way to GTNP to see all of the beauty the surrounding land has to offer. Be very careful and alert if driving in the area at night. It is common to see (very large) animals crossing roadways, and it could ruin your day (or life) to hit one.

ARS_WY_20160122_1276

What To Do

Oh my, I could go on and on here, but I’ll try to keep it brief…

First thing’s first; bordering to the North of Grand Teton Park is of course America’s first and most famous National Park, Yellowstone. So you’re going to want to devote a few days to this amazing landscape. But we’re not here to talk Yellowstone just yet… that’s for another post.

Hiking, backpacking, climbing, fishing, rafting, skiing, photography, snowshoeing, wildlife viewing, camping, exploring, and so much more are all fantastic activities to see/ do in this park. But bring your A game. This park is rugged and wild.

Wildlife

Since wolves, mountain lion, and grizzlies have made a comeback, there is more to think about when you’re out there than just what’s for lunch. The chances of any kind of attack are so slim, however, for your safety and the animals, there are a few things you’ll want to know. Check out the GTNP website here for great safety tips.

It is pretty common to see bison, elk, deer, moose, coyote, eagle, hawk, fox, and more. Then, if you’re lucky, you may see wolf, bear (black and grizzly), mountain lion, mountain goat, big horn sheep, etc. Keep a very safe distance with all of these animals… they are wild. And as scary as bears, lions, and wolves sound, more people are killed by bison every year! Please treat the animals with respect.

ARS_WY_20160122_1372-2

And if you’re out hiking or backpacking, please respect this beautiful park and practice Leave No Trace Ethics. If you are not familiar, please click the link and read more about it… but the gist is, leave a place as good or better than you found it. It’s a rule that I wholeheartedly use and endorse.

But don’t worry, LNT doesn’t apply to making snow angels :)

ARS_WY_20160122_1474

And that brings me to my next important “to do”… have fun and make memories! This place is one of the most special places in the world, much less the U.S. It is meant to be cherished, respected, AND enjoyed. So please, go with your family and friends, teach them about how to protect it, and then make some killer memories in Grand Teton National Park.

ARS_WY_20160122_1535

ARS_WY_20160123_1475

ARS_WY_20160123_1628

What to See

Just like most, if not all, of our Parks, there are several very famous spots, and for good reason. These places are amazingly gorgeous and oh so special.

Since like the rest of my #FindYourPark posts, this is simply an introduction, and by no means a comprehensive guide, I will only mention a few of my favorite spots. I’ll leave the rest up to you… And if you’re really interested in a guided experience, and you’d like to see all of my favorite secret spots, come with me this summer or fall!

The main ones, that are easy to get to and I have to visit every single time I’m there are; Snake River Overlook, Oxbow Bend, Schwabachers Landing, String Lake, Jackson Lake Dam, Colter Bay, plus a few others. Each are accessible by car or a very short hike, and most likely you won’t be the only person there. But these places are popular for a reason, so they make my list of ‘must see’.

ARS_WY_20160128_2930

ARS_WY_20160130_3266

If you’ve read my Big Bend post, this part may sound a little like deja vu… The River Road is a most exciting (but very dangerous) 4×4 road that gives you access to the most remote, drivable areas of the park. Also some of my favorite views. Be warned however, that this is a remote, oft void of any human activity, 4 wheel drive/ high clearance vehicle road. Many people have gotten themselves stuck out here. It is not nearly as remote as the road of the same name in Big Bend, but be careful none-the-less. FYI, you are also NOT supposed to camp out there.

ARS_WY_20160130_2959

In the winter, there is only one place to camp, and that’s at Colter Bay. Trust me when I tell you, if you don’t have the right gear (and even sometimes when you do) it can be pretty miserable to camp in the winter here.

ARS_WY_20160131_3974

ARS_WY_20160131_3986

ARS_WY_20160131_3144

ARS_WY_20160131_4354

It is hard to sum up this park. The Tetons are supremely majestic. Too often, people see GTNP on their way to of from Yellowstone, but in my opinion, it is in the top 5 best National Parks in the U.S. And my personal favorite, except maybe for Big Bend.

This park offers the sights, the wildlife, and the wildness that many Parks in other places just lack. It is this western wildness that makes it so special to me. You may feel this too when you visit. And it is something that very few places in the Lower 48 possess anymore. So please join with me in enjoying, but also conserving and respecting this magnificent place!

— andrew


Ellen and I are hitting the road full-time in June! Help support our journey by gifting yourself {or a loved ARS_RMNP_141023_1606one} one (or ten) of my National Park prints for only $59. THURSDAY, APRIL 14 from 6-10PM CST ONLY! The revenue will help propel us further and further on this great adventure, AND I’ll be donating 10% of the profits to the National Park Foundation! Enrich yourself and others… and feel great about it too as you’re helping to ensure our beautiful Parks for generations to come! But be quick, these prints are limited and normally $250, so they may go fast… LEARN MORE HERE >>


 
Want to learn photography and enjoy a guided experience? Check out my exciting, NEW workshop dates:
 
Big Bend NP // Night/ Landscape // 2016 – ONLY 2 SPOTS LEFT!
Isle of Skye // S C O T L A N D // 2016 – 4 SPOTS AVAILABLE
Highlands // S C O T L A N D // 2016 – 4 SPOTS AVAILABLE
 
If you are interested in licensing any of the images/ video from this post, please visit my stock agency:
 
Tandem Stills + Motion // Andrew R. Slaton
Image Brief // Andrew R. Slaton
 
If you are interested in purchasing prints from this post, please check my prints for sale, or email me directly for a custom request:
 
Andrew R. Slaton | photographer // prints
 
For assignment work requests, please email me: andrew@andrewslatonphoto.com
 
Thanks for visiting AndrewSlatonBlog.com!
 
all images and content © ARS Media, LLC 2016
 
Standard
photography, travel

#ontheroad

 

ARS_WY_141013_00220

Well, we’re officially announcing going on the road full time. We’ve been talking about it for a year now, and though we don’t know what tomorrow will bring, we’re moving forward. Starting this June 1, we will travel the U.S. and Canada, photographing the National Parks, shooting for several large and small outdoor brands and magazines, and living our dream! But it’s not going to be easy.

That’s why we need your help. In order to give us a little momentum, we would like to invite everyone to visit our online art show this Thursday evening starting at 6PM CST for the chance to get my National Park prints for only $59 (in honor of the 59 parks). They are usually $250+, signed, limited editions, so they may go fast. The show benefits The National Park Foundation (10%) and our efforts to inspire folks protect our wild places and to get outside!

Watch our video trailer to get pumped with us!

Check out the page now to pick out your favorites before hand, then bookmark the page so you can get what you want right when the show begins on Thursday. And please share with anyone and everyone you think would be interested! Living on the road will be amazing, but not easy to make it all work financially… so help us make this dream a reality!

http://www.andrewslatonphoto.com/print-event

Thanks so much for all of your support, and we look forward to meeting many of you #ontheroad!

— andrew


In honor of the NPS Centennial this year, I have put together a special collection of (some never before seen) my favorite National Park prints. Please check it out and know that 5% of all the profits from the sale of this artwork will be donated to a wonderful organization that works hard to help preserve our Nation’s most magical places, The National Park Foundation.. We will be visiting almost all of the 59 National Parks this year, so check back often as we will be updating the page regularly. Thank you so much for your support!


 
Want to learn photography and enjoy a guided experience? Check out my exciting, NEW workshop dates:
 
TELLURIDE SUMMER 2016 – 4 SPOTS AVAILABLE
TELLURIDE FALL 2016 – 4 SPOTS AVAILABLE
ULTIMATE WYOMING SUMMER 2016 – SOLD OUT, WAIT LIST ONLY
 
If you are interested in licensing any of the images/ video from this post, please visit my stock agencies:
 
Tandem Stills + Motion // Andrew R. Slaton
Image Brief // Andrew R. Slaton
 
If you are interested in purchasing prints from this post, please check my prints for sale, or email me directly for a custom request:
 
Andrew R. Slaton | photographer // prints
 
For assignment work requests, please email me: andrew@andrewslatonphoto.com
 
all images and content © ARS Media, LLC 2016

 

Standard
photography, random thought, travel

#FindYourPark | BIG BEND

Now we’re talking! Big Bend is my home park… So I’ve got lots of good insight for you here.

I’ve been making the 9 hour drive to this remote National Park for the last 15 years (over 20 times!), and I can’t think of a better place to go. What is it that keeps me going back?? Well, if you like to explore, find solitude, star gaze, hike… you’re in luck. And if you like 4×4 roads, there are over 150 miles of dirt roads (more than any other park in the continental U.S.!) for you to drive and explore.

driving the chisos basin road in big bend national park, texas

ARS_BBNP_150408_9670

ARS_BBNP_150408_9704

During a few weeks in March/ April every year, the desert comes alive with color. Texas wildflowers dot the vast, wide open spaces of Big Bend, and the otherwise drably colored desert flora become neon green with life.

ARS_BBNP_150408_9800

ARS_BBNP_150409_9989

ARS_BBNP_150408_9706

agave americana (century plant) in bloom in juniper canyon, big bend national park, texas

ARS_DVN_150404_7474

But it’s not only Spring that is magnificent in Big Bend… Winter is actually one of the favorite times of year for seasoned BBNP adventurers. And it’s really simple… the Chihuahuan desert stays quite mild in temp throughout the whole season. A great place for snow birds to escape the cold get a little r+r.

sunset over the chihuahuan desert, big bend national park, texas

ARS_BBNP_150409_9981

You know, come to think of it, I’ve been in every season… and they each have their benefits. Fall is nice and mild. Summer’s pretty hot, but you get to see some of the most spectacular lighting storms you’ve ver witnessed.

Let’s just get something out of the way here early… Yes, there are snakes. Well, and lots of other creepy crawlies. It’s a desert, so you can expect many of your phobias to run wild… unless you’re like me and you love these fascinating creatures. But let me calm your fears… Though they are there, it is pretty rare that you come across any snakes, tarantulas, locusts, centipedes, etc., unless of course, you’re looking for them. :)

ARS_BBNP_150409_0295

ARS_BBNP_150409_0283

But you might not be expecting some of the other amazing fauna of Big Bend. There are javalina, jackrabbits, black bear, bobcat, mountain lion, deer, and so much more.

black-tailed jackrabbit in big bend national park, texas

giant millipede, big bend national park, texas

Getting There

So why is Big Bend the Nation’s least visited National Park?? Well, one of it’s greatest strengths is also a weakness in some folks’ eyes. It is REMOTE. The closest airport is in Midland, Texas (MAF), which is about 4 hour drive. You can also fly into El Paso (ELP), but you’re looking at closer to a 5 hour drive. From Dallas, it’s a 9 hour drive and from Austin, it’s 7.

But it’s exactly this very remote aspect that makes it so special in many ways. Ever visited Yosemite or Yellowstone in the summer? Then you’ll know how difficult it can be to hear yourself think! Even in the backcountry, it is common to pass dozens of hikers and backpackers in some of the more popular parks. I know, I know… it doesn’t keep me from going either. But the benefit of Big Bend is that you can have a once in a lifetime personal experience with nature in one of our Nation’s (and the world’s, for that matter) most spectacular natural treasures. If you’ve ever been, you know what I mean… don’t fool yourself by leaving this park off your bucket list because it’s a pain to get to.

Trust me on this.

Where to Stay

National Park tip #2: If you recall my NP tip #1 from Mount Rainier, you’ll be thrown a bit for a loop at BBNP. Big Bend is in Texas, which has very little public land left, so the park is surrounded mostly by private ranches. And it is such a huge piece of land (over 800,000 acres!), that you really do want to stay in the park, to get the most out of your time.

So where to stay??

Well, you may be drawn to the designated campsites, like Rio Grande Village, Cottonwood, or Chisos Basin, but in my opinion, the “backcountry” drive up sites are the best. You’ll pay around $14 per night for the maintained campgrounds and likely have loud neighbors. If you instead go to the office at Panther Junction and ask for a backcountry drive up site, you’ll pay $12 for a full week! No facilities, but plenty of nature and solitude… now that’s my kind of experience.

ARS_BBNP_150408_9837

If you need the amenities of home, well you too are in luck! The Chisos Mountain Lodge offers several rooms and private cabins, nestled in the beautiful Chisos Basin, at reasonable nightly rates. And with a restaurant just a short walk away, it’s quite a comfortable stay. We prefer to get away and rough it, but to each their own…

camping in the desert on the dodson trail, big bend national park, texas

What To Do

Hiking is one of the most common and popular activities at Big Bend. There are hundreds of miles of trails that span every ecosystem of the area including the surprisingly robust Chihuahuan Desert, the high mountain desert plateau of the Chisos Mountains, and the flood plains of the mighty Rio Grande river. Be advised though, depending upon what time of year you visit, it is recommended that you bring 1 gallon of water per person per day you will be out.

ARS_BBNP_150406_7799

ARS_BBNP_150406_7790

ARS_BBNP_150408_9929

Bird Watching is another popular activity in and around the park. Big Bend’s location, near the 100th meridian in the middle of the continent and along a migration route, is ideal for bird diversity throughout the year. It is also the year round home to some fascinating species, like the Peregrine Falcon, Mexican Jay, Colima Warbler, and Roadrunner.

ARS_BBNP_150408_9788

Backpacking

With 42 backcountry campsites in the Chisos mountains accessible only by foot, Big Bend boasts some pretty epic backpacking. However, due to rocky conditions, high temps, very dry air, and the extreme remoteness of the backcountry, novice backpackers are discouraged from testing their limits here. Each year, park rangers respond to emergencies when hikers are not prepared for the heat and extreme conditions of the desert. Please be sure to check in with the backcountry permit office before embarking on your journey… permits are required and will give you a heads up on any dangers you might encounter.

ARS_BBNP_20151118_3697

ARS_BBNP_150405_7747

Stargazing

Big Bend is known as one of the most outstanding places in North America for star gazing.  In fact, it has the least light pollution of any other National Park unit in the lower 48 (according to NPS). This is the best of surprises to visitors when they see the Milky Way in its full glory for perhaps the first time in their life. Realistically one can see approximately 2000 stars on a clear night here compared to perhaps a few hundred in a medium sized city.

So if you’re in to astrophotography like me, this is the place for you! You might even want to consider joining me for my annual Big Bend night and landscape workshop.

Starrs over the Chisos

ARS_BBNP_20151116_2076

ARS_BBNP_20151118_3855

ARS_BBNP_20151116_2047

There really is nothing like Big Bend. You have to see and experience it to understand. And as you’ll surely come across, those who have been, never stop making their pilgrimages back to that magical swath of desert. Some more frequently than others, but it is said that “you never go to Big Bend just once in your lifetime.”

What to See

I’m guessing if you’ve read this far, you’re in. “So,” you might be asking, “what are the main sights to see?” Well, there are several very famous spots, but just know that there are also many hidden gems in Big Bend that may not be on any of your maps or guidebooks. That’s okay, you can definitely find some them… you just have to be a little resourceful and very respectful of these precious few secret places. People are usually happy to share their favorite off-map trails.

Since this is simply an introduction, and by no means a comprehensive guide, I will only mention a few of my favorite spots. I’ll leave the rest up to you… And if you’re really interested in a guided experience, and you’d like to see all of my favorite secret spots, come with me in March!

The Dodson Trail gives you unparalleled views of the Chihuahuan Desert and Mexico to the South.

panoramic view of the chihuahuan desert from the dodson trail, big bend national park, texas

The River Road is a most exciting (but very dangerous) 4×4 road that gives you access to the most remote campsites in the park, but also some of my favorite views. Be warned that this is an incredibly remote, oft void of any human activity for days, 4 wheel drive high clearance vehicle road. Many people have gotten themselves stuck out here and had to hike for days to get out without ever seeing another soul… Not naming any names here…

tent camping at dusk on the rio grande and the chisos mountains in big bend national park, texas

rio grande and the chisos mountains in big bend national park, texas

The view from Emory Peak is quite spectacular. It’s the tallest point in the park at just over 7,800 feet.

ARS_BBNP_150408_9804

The area around Panther Junction provides amazing views for sunset and sunrise. You can look back into the desert to the North or watch the light dance on the Chisos to the South. Either way, you won’t be disappointed. Dusk and dawn out here is well worth losing sleep, I promise.

colorful dawn over the chihuahuan desert in big bend national park, texas

Santa Elena Canyon is one of the most famous sights in the park. Ansel Adams even photographed this… it is a must see.

sunrise on santa elena canyon and rio grande in big bend national park, texas

ARS_BBNP_150405_7739

There is so much information on this lesser-known park, I could seriously spend months writing about this special place, revealing so many of its secrets. But here’s where I leave you… with a simple call to action. Go. See. Explore for yourself, and experience why this is one of America’s greatest treasures!

— andrew

P.S. with all of these #findyourpark posts of late (and many more upcoming), I wanted to let you know about a wonderful organization that works hard to help preserve our Nation’s most magical places, The National Park Foundation. In honor of the NPS Centennial this year, I have put together a special collection of (some never before seen) my favorite National Park prints. Please check it out and know that 5% of all the profits from the sale of this artwork will be donated to the Foundation. We will be visiting almost all of the 59 National Parks this year, so check back often as we will be updating the page regularly. Thank you so much for your support!


 
Want to learn photography and enjoy a guided experience? Check out my exciting, NEW workshop dates:
 
Big Bend NP // Night/ Landscape // 2016
Isle of Skye // S C O T L A N D // 2016
Highlands // S C O T L A N D // 2016
 
If you are interested in licensing any of the images/ video from this post, please visit my stock agency:
 
Tandem Stills + Motion // Andrew R. Slaton
Image Brief // Andrew R. Slaton
 
If you are interested in purchasing prints from this post, please check my prints for sale, or email me directly for a custom request:
 
Andrew R. Slaton | photographer // prints
 
For assignment work requests, please email me: andrew@andrewslatonphoto.com
 
Thanks for visiting AndrewSlatonBlog.com!
 
all images and content © ARS Media, LLC 2016
 
 
Standard
photography, travel

#findyourpark | The Centennial

They’ve been called “National Treasures” and “America’s Best Idea”… Our National Parks. Both characterizations are absolutely on point.

On August 25 of this year, the National Park Service (NPS) turns 100. And I am proud to celebrate with our country (and the rest of the world) to honor the hard work and confluence of ideas that go in to preserving these special and sacred places for generations to come!

In honor of the National Park Service Centennial, I have compiled a collection of my favorite prints from these National treasures. Ellen and I hit the road full time this summer, just in time to visit several new parks before the Centennial, so I will be updating the page regularly to reflect the new parks we visit! To show our support, I’ll be donating 5% of all profits from these print sales to the National Park Foundation, the official non-profit partner of the NPS.

And from now until August 25, 2016, please enjoy 25% off all sizes of my fine-art, limited edition National Park prints! Use code “NPS100” at checkout for any signed, numbered, limited edition print of America’s National Parks.

Please join with me in celebrating and supporting Our National Parks! See the (growing) collection here

— andrew


 
Join me on an amazing adventure… check out my exciting, NEW workshop dates:
 
Big Bend NP // Night/ Landscape // 2016
Isle of Skye // S C O T L A N D // 2016
Highlands // S C O T L A N D // 2016
 
If you are interested in licensing any of the images/ video from this post, please visit my stock agency:
 
Tandem Stills + Motion // Andrew R. Slaton
Image Brief // Andrew R. Slaton
 
If you are interested in purchasing prints from this post, please check my prints for sale, or email me directly for a custom request:
 
Andrew R. Slaton | photographer // prints
 
For assignment work requests, please email me: andrew@andrewslatonphoto.com
 
Thanks for visiting AndrewSlatonBlog.com!
 
all images and content © ARS Media, LLC 2016
 
Standard
photography, random thought, travel

Winter in Big Bend

We just returned from our annual birthday trip for Ellen to Big Bend. And this one was extra special.

It’s always a special experience to spend time in nature at one of our national treasures. But Ellen and I are making some big changes in our businesses and life together, and we needed time to “recharge our batteries.”

See, we get our energy from alone time. I guess that’s the classic definition of introverts. But we’re not exactly classic introverts. We love people and social situations… we just don’t exactly get our energy from others.

The last few months have been busy with preparing to go on the road full time… getting rid of a lot of “stuff”, cold calling potential brand sponsors and partners, working overtime to increase our social presence, etc. It’s been so fun, but also utterly exhausting. It’s been work, I guess you could say. :)

So we headed out to the desert for 10 days or so. To of course get a little work done, but mostly to relax and recharge.

ARS_BBNP_20151115_9512

ARS_BBNP_20151112_0001

ARS_BBNP_20151112_0045

ARS_BBNP_20151112_0056

ARS_BBNP_20151112_0083

ARS_BBNP_20151112_9449

ARS_BBNP_20151112_0110

ARS_BBNP_20151112_0113

ARS_BBNP_20151113_0194

ARS_BBNP_20151113_0198

ARS_BBNP_20151113_0308

ARS_BBNP_20151114_0371

ARS_BBNP_20151114_0404

And as a bonus, a few great friends showed up to spend a little QT with us…

ARS_BBNP_20151114_0723

ARS_BBNP_20151114_0834

ARS_BBNP_20151115_1732

ARS_BBNP_20151115_1793

ARS_BBNP_20151115_1837

ARS_BBNP_20151115_1885

ARS_BBNP_20151116_1911

I finally started a series I’ve been wanting to do for a while now. Dave is the first installation of a portrait series I’m doing of National Park volunteers. Now, whenever we visit a park, I aim to meet and photograph one of our many wonderful volunteers. They give their time to help provide information to visitors and to keep the parks clean. Thanks Dave for your service, and for being my first!

ARS_BBNP_20151116_1914   ARS_BBNP_20151116_1920   ARS_BBNP_20151116_1930

ARS_BBNP_20151116_1996

ARS_BBNP_20151116_2012

ARS_BBNP_20151116_2014

ARS_BBNP_20151116_2023

ARS_BBNP_20151116_2029

ARS_BBNP_20151116_2032

ARS_BBNP_20151116_2038

ARS_BBNP_20151116_2047

ARS_BBNP_20151117_3521

ARS_BBNP_20151118_3568

ARS_BBNP_20151118_3574

ARS_BBNP_20151118_3580

ARS_BBNP_20151118_3586

ARS_BBNP_20151118_3697

ARS_BBNP_20151118_9519

ARS_BBNP_20151118_3720

ARS_BBNP_20151118_3855

ARS_BBNP_20151118_3865

ARS_BBNP_20151119_3900

ARS_BBNP_20151112_9988

It feels like we never have enough time in Big Bend. But it is our “home” park, so when we hit the road full time, I know we will make it a base of sorts. Big Bend is a really special place. If you’ve never been, you need to add it to your park bucket list. Better yet, come with us in March and expand your photographic skills.

Hope to see you all out in the desert soon!

— andrew


 
Join me on an amazing adventure… check out my exciting, NEW workshop dates:
 
Big Bend NP // Night/ Landscape // 2016
Isle of Skye // S C O T L A N D // 2016
Highlands // S C O T L A N D // 2016
 
If you are interested in licensing any of the images/ video from this post, please visit my stock agency:
 
Tandem Stills + Motion // Andrew R. Slaton
Image Brief // Andrew R. Slaton
 
If you are interested in purchasing prints from this post, please check my prints for sale, or email me directly for a custom request:
 
Andrew R. Slaton | photographer // prints
 
For assignment work requests, please email me: andrew@andrewslatonphoto.com
 
Thanks for visiting AndrewSlatonBlog.com!
 
all images and content © ARS Media, LLC 2015
 
 
Standard